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Can A Car Owner Be Responsible For A Car Accident Involving Their Car?

Can A Vehicle Owner Responsible If Someone Gets Into An Accident In Their Car?


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Can A Vehicle Owner Responsible If Someone Gets Into An Accident In Their Car?

The owner of a vehicle can be responsible in some cases if they permitted someone to driver their car and that person gets into a car accident. This concept is called negligent entrustment. In essence under this concept, if an owner permits a person they know is unfit to operate a vehicle and that person causes a crash, the owner is responsible. Negligent entrustment can also apply when an owner knew or had a reason to know that unfit driver was using their vehicle and failed to stop it.

Who Can Be Responsible For Negligent Entrustment?

One of the leading cases on negligent entrustment in Nevada is the case of Zugel by Zugel v. Miller, 100 Nev. 525, 688 P.2d 310 (1984). In that case, a 13-year old purchased a motorcycle with the permission of his parents. The parents claimed they told their son not to drive the motorcycle on the public streets. But the son did, with a friend of his as a passenger. The son ran a stop sign and caused an accident. The passenger made a claim against the teenage driver and his parents. The parents disclaimed responsibility for negligent entrustment.

 

The Nevada Supreme Court disagreed with the parents. What swayed the Court was the son’s testimony that his parents knew he routinely rode his motorcycle on public streets. As stated by the Court, “[f]rom this fact alone the jury could have inferred that respondents possessed knowledge of their son’s activities of driving the motorcycle on public roadways.”

Under this theory of liability, the entrusting person need not have known that the motor vehicle was going to be driven on a public roadway. In fact, a parent who entrusts his child with a motor vehicle may be found liable under a theory of negligent entrustment even when the parent expressly instructs the child not to use the vehicle on a public roadway.

Nevada Supreme Court

The doctrine of negligent entrustment does not apply unless the person that gave permission is the owner of the vehicle. For example, in Mills v. Continental Parking Corp., 86 Nev. 724, 475 P.2d 673 (Nev. 1970), a parking attendant gave keys to a car’s owner who was allegedly obviously drunk. The drunk car owner then hit and killed a pedestrian. The Court held that the parking attendant cannot be held responsible for returning the keys to the owner, even though the owner was drunk. The Court reasoned, essentially, that the parking attendant had an obligation to return to the keys; otherwise, the attendant can be liable for conversion.

 

In Las Vegas, tourists too get into car accidents in rental vehicles. The question arises in those situations as to whether the rental car company can be responsible for a renter is an unfit driver. Under N.R.S. 483.610, a rental car company is required to check driver’s licenses, unless the renter comes from a country or state that does not require driver’s licenses. This statute further requires the rental company to visually inspect the license and compare the driver’s signature with that on the license. Attorneys for insurance companies and the rental companies have argued that this statute does not require rental car companies to verify that a driver has a valid driver’s license or is fit to drive a car.

What does it mean to be unfit or incompetent driver?

Not everyone who negligently causes a car accident is an unfit or incompetent driver. To answer the question of what is an unfit or incompetent driver, we have to look at the laws that says who can’t or shouldn’t drive. The easiest and least disputable is a drunk driver. The law says that a driver who is impaired by alcohol or drugs shouldn’t be driving and penalizes drunk drivers. A car owner who lets a driver they know to be drunk or otherwise impaired to driver their car is responsible for negligent entrustment.

An owner who permits an unlicensed person to drive their vehicle may also be responsible for negligent entrustment. In Zugel v. Zugel, the Court found the parents liable even though their son had driven the motorcycle a number of times. Why? Because the law said that the son, who had no driver’s license, was not legally competent to drive.

There may be other situations where a vehicle owner is responsible for a car accident caused by a driver they lent the car to. To find out if negligent entrustment applies in your case, it is best to speak to a car accident attorney who has experience pursuing claims for negligent entrustment.

If you or a loved one have been injured in a car accident and want to know who is responsible for paying for your injuries, speak to an experienced Las Vegas Car Accident Attorneys at D.R. Patti & Associates. Our skilled Las Vegas accident attorneys will answer your questions and conduct any needed research and investigation to ensure full compensation for our clients.

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The Right Way To Handle Injury Claims From Multiple Car Accidents

Las Vegas personal injury attorneys

Some people are just unlucky. Through no fault of their own, they are injured in multiple car accidents in a short amount of time. We had a client who was in four crashes in 14 months, and he wasn’t cited in any of them. We had another client who was in three crashes in 3 months, two of them a week apart. Again, in none of them was she cited by the police as at fault. Those are the extreme examples, but sadly, it’s not uncommon to see someone become a victim to multiple car accidents.

What is also unfortunately, we have also seen personal injury claims from multiple car accidents handled incorrectly. Clients have come to us after being dropped by another Las Vegas car accident attorney or feeling that they are not receiving the fair value of their injury claim. In those cases, we learn that the clients’ prior attorney had treated each crash as a separate injury claim, even though the crashes combined to produce the clients’ injury. That is, the prior attorney sent out separate demands to the insurance company for each accident. Then each insurance company offered an amount far below the value of the claim, arguing that only a portion of the injuries was caused by that accident. The other insurance company on the second accident did the same. In cases where we get the case early enough, we were able to fix the case and obtain a much higher compensation for the clients.

Being involved in multiple car accidents does not have to complicate personal injury claims, if handled appropriately in the beginning. We’re going to cover the do’s and don’ts in handling personal injury claims from multiple car accidents. The primary thing to remember is to focus, not on the number of crashes, but on the injury or injuries. If two or more car accidents caused injuries to separate body parts, then you have multiple injury claims. However, if two or more car accidents injured the same body part, then you’re really looking at one injury claim against multiple defendants. In that situation, the multiple defendants are likely jointly and severally liable for the injury to the same body part.

What Is Joint And Several Liability?

Joint and several liability is a legal concept that holds multiple defendants equally responsible for the same damages. When two or more defendants are joint and severally liable, any of the defendants can be responsible for the entirety of a victim’s damages. The reason behind this concept is to protect an innocent victim. Under joint and several liability, if one defendant becomes bankrupt, the innocent victim can go after the defendants for all of his or her damages.

Nevada applies joint and several liability to only a few situations. Those situations are listed in NRS § 41.141. What is not listed there is a situation involving an indivisible injury. Even though not listed there, joint and several liability still applies.

What Is An Indivisible Injury?

In the context of a personal injury claim, an indivisible injury is an injury to a body part caused by one accident and is then aggravated by another accident. The injury would be indivisible if medical professionals cannot separate the injury caused by the first accident from the second accident.

The Nevada Supreme Court expressly addressed the situation presented here: two motor vehicle collisions, occurring at separate times, and causing a single indivisible injury. In Kleitz v. Raskin, 103 Nev. 325, 738 P.2d 508 (1987), the plaintiff injured his back in an auto accident that occurred on December 23, 1981. About a month later, the plaintiff’s doctor recommended that plaintiff be hospitalized for his injury. On his way to the hospital, the plaintiff was injured in a second accident. The plaintiff then sued the people who caused both accidents. The Nevada Supreme Court ruled that two defendants can be jointly and severally liable for the entire amount of damages attributable to the back injury under the following conditions. First, the plaintiff must establish that the second accident caused or aggravated plaintiff’s injuries. Then, the defendants must apportion plaintiff’s injury, and if they are unable to do so, both defendants are jointly and severally liable. The Court reasoned that, since the defendants caused the accidents, they should bear the burden of trying to separate or apportion the injuries. An innocent victim should not have to bear that burden.

Applying joint and several liability to situations involving indivisible injuries is well recognized at common law. In fact, the Nevada Supreme Court in the Kleitz case relied on a Washington state court decision involving a similar factual scenario. In Phenna v. Whalen, 28 Wash.App. 19, 621 P.2d 1304 (1980), a plaintiff in her sixties was injured while a passenger in a Metro bus that was involved in an accident. Along with aggravating a prior injury to her back, she also developed neck and upper back pain. About four months later, she was driving her own car and was struck by another car. Afterwards, the plaintiff returned to her doctor and complained that the second accident worsened her symptoms. Her doctor ultimately opined that her injuries from both accidents were permanent.

The Washington court had to deal with the question whether the plaintiff’s damages should be apportioned between the two defendants or hold both the defendants equally and jointly responsible. Analyzing a number of other cases, the Phenna court reached the conclusion that the Nevada Supreme Court would later adopt in Kleitz

Do’s and Don’ts of Handling Indivisible Injury From Multiple Car Accidents

  • DO tell your doctors about the accidents you’ve been injured in
  • DON’T treat with different doctors for each accident
  • DO see the same doctors after each accident
  • DO keep a pain journal so you can document your pain level before and after a crash. Of course, no one knows when they could end up being involved in another accident. But, if you keep a pain journal after the first accident, then you already have a record of your symptoms and their severity IF you do get into a second accident.
  • DON’T send out separate demands and try to apportion the damages yourself.
  • DO send one demand to the insurance companies for the people that caused the accident.
  • DON’T think you can get more money by making a separate claim for each accident or hiring a different attorney for each accident.
  • DO maximize the value of case by hiring the same Las Vegas personal injury lawyer for both accidents

Punitive Damages In Las Vegas Personal Injury Cases

Punitive Damages in Las Vegas Personal Injury Cases

Many people have heard the term “punitive damages” and want to know how it applies to their personal injury or car accident claim in Las Vegas. “Punitive damages” is an amount that is awarded by a jury to punish a party in a civil lawsuit. This term is also sometimes called “exemplary damages,” as the award is intended to set an example. Punitive or exemplary damages is usually contrasted with compensatory damages, which are intended to make an accident victim whole again. Compensatory damages usually include medical bills, lost income, pain and suffering, and lost enjoyment of life.

Punitive damages cannot be awarded in most cases. For a personal injury plaintiff to even be able a jury for punitive damages, the plaintiff must show that the defendant was more than negligent. Negligence generally means careless. In other words, to be able to ask for punitive damages, a plaintiff must show that a defendant was more than careless. In Nevada, usually, this means showing that a defendant acted intentionally, recklessly, or with intent to do harm. In car accident cases, punitive damages usually do not apply but may apply in drunk driving cases. It should also apply to cases where a defendant was texting and driving.

In the McDonald’s coffee cup case that a lot of people seem to know about, the biggest portion of the jury’s award was the punitive damages. The jury in that case awarded $2.7 million against McDonalds. The large jury award in the case upset many people. Those people tend to refer to the McDonald’s case as an example of a frivolous lawsuit where the accident victim became rich. However, the purpose of that $2.7 million award was to punish McDonalds. The plaintiff’s attorney in that case showed that McDonalds served their coffee at temperatures higher than other restaurants. They also showed that, in a decade, McDonalds received about 700 complaints of people suffering burns from their coffee. In awarding punitive damages against McDonalds, the jury believed that McDonalds needed to be punished for their policy and deterred from continuing to follow this policy.

Nevada Law On Punitive Damages

In Nevada, the legislature enacted laws that governs when punitive damages can be awarded. Those laws can be found in Chapter 42 of the Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS). Under NRS § 42.005, a jury may award punitive damages against a defendant who “has been guilty of oppression, fraud or malice, express or implied.” NRS § 42.001 defines these terms as follows:

NRS § 42.001. Definitions; exceptions. As used in this chapter, unless the context otherwise requires and except as otherwise provided in subsection 5 of NRS 42.005:

  1.       “Conscious disregard” means the knowledge of the probable harmful consequences of a wrongful act and a willful and deliberate failure to act to avoid those consequences.
  2.       “Fraud” means an intentional misrepresentation, deception or concealment of a material fact known to the person with the intent to deprive another person of his or her rights or property or to otherwise injure another person.
  3.       “Malice, express or implied” means conduct which is intended to injure a person or despicable conduct which is engaged in with a conscious disregard of the rights or safety of others.
  4.       “Oppression” means despicable conduct that subjects a person to cruel and unjust hardship with conscious disregard of the rights of the person.

The Nevada legislature also limited how much punitive damages can be awarded in most cases. Subsection (1) of NRS § 42.005 limits the amount of punitive damage awards as follows:

  1. Except as otherwise provided in NRS § 42.007, in an action for the breach of an obligation not arising from contract, where it is proven by clear and convincing evidence that the defendant has been guilty of oppression, fraud or malice, express or implied, the plaintiff, in addition to the compensatory damages, may recover damages for the sake of example and by way of punishing the defendant. Except as otherwise provided in this section or by specific statute, an award of exemplary or punitive damages made pursuant to this section may not exceed:

(a) Three times the amount of compensatory damages awarded to the plaintiff if the amount of compensatory damages is $100,000 or more; or

(b) Three hundred thousand dollars if the amount of compensatory damages awarded to the plaintiff is less than $100,000.

The above limitation on punitive damages do not apply to product defect or product liability cases and to insurance bad faith cases, amongst others. See NRS § 42.005(2).

Examples of Punitive Damage Awards in Nevada

In a recent Las Vegas medical malpractice case, a jury assessed $8 million in punitive damages against a local hand surgeon. The jury found that the hand surgeon had committed fraud. The plaintiff, a U.S. Air Force pilot, claimed that the surgeon performed a procedure that was not the standard of care. In fact, the plaintiff presented expert testimony that no other hand surgeon ever performed or would have performed the same procedure. The plaintiff also argued that the surgeon performed the procedure in order to guarantee that the plaintiff will require future procedures, for which the surgeon can financially benefit.

In a product liability lawsuit, plaintiffs alleged that a drug manufacturer sold hormone replacement therapy drugs that increased the risk of getting breast cancer and failed to adequately warn its customers. The jury found that the defendant guilty of malice or fraud, and a separate trial was held on the question of how much the punitive damage award should be. Following that separate trial, the jury awarded a total of $99 million in punitive damages against the defendant. See Wyeth v. Rowatt, 126 Nev. 446, 244 P.3d 765 (Nev. 2010).

If you or a loved one have been injured and want to know if punitive damages apply to your personal injury case, speak to a Las Vegas personal injury and car accident attorney at D.R. Patti & Associates. Our experienced personal injury attorneys have dealt with punitive damages on many occasions and can answer your questions. Call 702-331-3391 for a free case consultation.

Timeline of a Las Vegas Personal Injury Lawsuit

Timeline of a Las Vegas Personal Injury Lawsuit

A lawsuit begins with the filing of a complaint. Generally, if the accident occurred in Las Vegas, the complaint would be filed in state court. In some cases where damages exceed $75,000.00 and the parties reside in different states from each other, those cases can be filed with the federal court. This timeline will focus on cases filed in state court. The person on whose behalf the lawsuit is filed is called the plaintiff. The person being sued is called the defendant.

The amount of damages an injured person is seeking determines which state court the lawsuit is filed in. If the damages do not exceed $15,000.00, the case is filed with the Las Vegas Justice Court. If the damages exceed $15,000.00, the case is filed with the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Las Vegas Personal Injury Cases In The Eighth Judicial District Court

In personal injury cases (except Medical Malpractice), a lawsuit must be filed no later than the second anniversary of the accident. This is called the statute of limitations. This means that if the car accident or slip and fall that caused your injuries occurred on July 1, 2020, the lawsuit must be filed by July 1, 2022. If the lawsuit is not filed by the second anniversary, the lawsuit will be dismissed. Nevada’s statute of limitations applicable in personal injury cases can be found in NRS § 11.190.
Once the complaint is filed, the plaintiff has 120 days to serve the defendant with the complaint and a summons. This step is called service of process. A defendant must be served before the court can have jurisdiction over the defendant. The laws governing service of process can be found in Rules 4 and 4.2 of the Nevada Rules of Civil Procedure (“NRCP”). Failure to serve the defendant without good cause before the 120 expires can result in dismissal of the lawsuit. If additional time is needed to serve the defendant, a plaintiff should seek an extension with the court before the 120 days expires.
The best and primary way to serve a defendant is through personal service, which means that a defendant is personally handed the complaint and summons. Any person over the age of 18 years old and not a party to the lawsuit can serve the defendant. See NRCP Rule 4(c)(3). If the defendant is a legal entity, such as a corporation or a limited liability company, the company’s registered agent for service of process can be served. If the defendant is a Nevada corporation or limited liability company, you can find out who the registered agent is through the Nevada Secretary of State’s website.

If the defendant cannot be found, Rules 4 and 4.4 of the NRCP provides for alternatives to personal service. To be able to utilize those alternatives, the plaintiff or her attorneys must show that they conducted due diligence in locating defendant and attempting to serve them. Alternatives to personal service including publishing the complaint and summons.

Once the defendant is served, they have 20 days to file an answer. Once the defendant files an answer, the plaintiff can request exemption from the mandatory Court Annexed Arbitration Program or proceed through the program.

The Mandatory Court Annexed Arbitration Program

In the Eighth Judicial District Court, all cases are automatically enrolled in the mandatory Court Annexed Arbitration Program. Thus, unless exempted, all cases must first be arbitrated.  The purpose of this Arbitration Program “is to provide a simplified procedure for obtaining a prompt and equitable resolution of cervical civil matters.” Absent good cause, arbitration hearings for cases in the program must be held within 6 months after appointment of an arbitrator. The laws governing the Arbitration Program can be found in the Rules Governing Alternative Dispute Resolution.

A case is exempted from the program if the case involves a claim in excess of $50,000.00. There are other reasons a case can be exempted from the program, such as public policy. A request for exemption must be submitted to the Arbitration Commissioner within 20 days after the defendant files an answer.

If a Las Vegas personal injury case is worth less than $50,000.00, it will usually be first arbitrated. In an arbitration, the case is decided by a qualified neutral third-party. Sometime after an answer is filed, the parties in such a case will receive a list of five potential arbitrators, usually local attorneys. Each party can de-select two of the potential arbitrators, and the Arbitration Commissioner will select the arbitrator from the remaining names.

The decision of the arbitrator is non-binding, unless the parties agree otherwise. This means that once the arbitrator issues her decision, either party to the lawsuit can elect to proceed to a trial by filing a “Request for Trial De Novo” within 30 days after the arbitrator issues her decision. If such a Request is filed, the lawsuit will proceed through the Short Trial program unless a party demands removal from the program within 10 days after the Request. If a lawsuit is removed from the Short Trial program, the lawsuit proceeds on the regular course of litigation.

As with the Court Annexed Arbitration Program, the Short Trial program is intended to provide a faster resolution of a lawsuit. Unlike a regular trial, a trial in the Short Trial program must occur within 120 days after the presiding judge is appointed. In a lawsuit that is not in the Short Trial program, it can take a year or more for a case goes to trial. There are other difference. Unlike a regular trial, a case in the Short Trial program only has 1 day to try the case in front of a jury of four people. Also unlike a regular trial, a pro tempore judge, rather than a district court judge, can preside over a Short Trial. The Short Trial rules can be found in the Nevada Short Trial Rules.

Scheduling Conference & Discovery

After a Las Vegas personal injury lawsuit is exempted from arbitration or an arbitrator is appointed, a scheduling conference will be held with the parties or their attorneys. If the case is in the Arbitration Program, the scheduling conference will be set by the arbitrator. If the case is not in the Arbitration Program, the plaintiff will schedule the conference. In the scheduling conference, the parties discuss how long they need to conduct “discovery” and set deadlines.
Discovery is essentially the process during which each side conducts their investigation and discloses the evidence they intend on using at trial. The Nevada Rules of Civil Procedure provide for the following ways to conduct discovery:

  • Interrogatories (NRCP Rule 33)
  • Requests for Production of Documents (NRCP Rule 34)
  • Requests for Admissions (NRCP Rule 36)
  • Depositions (NRCP Rule 30)
  • Site Inspections (NRCP Rule 34)
  • Independent Medical Examination (NRCP Rule 35)
  • Subpoenas (NRCP Rule 45)

In cases outside the Arbitration Program or Short Trial Program, the discovery period could last longer than 6 months after the scheduling conference. Oftentimes, it could be as long as a year. The more complex a case is, the longer the discovery period could take. If the parties cannot agree on how long the discovery period should be, the district court judge assigned to the case or the Discovery Commissioner will set the discovery period.
Along with the discovery period, the other deadlines the parties can either agree to or the court can set include deadlines for filing pre-trial motions, deadlines for disclosing experts, and the deadline for the case to be ready for trial.

Dispositive Motions, Pre-Trial Motions & Trial

In cases outside the Court Annexed Arbitration Program or Short Trial Program, the next deadline the parties usually face after the discovery period is the deadline to file dispositive motions. This deadline is usually set 30 days after the end of the discovery period. Dispositive motions are papers or briefs submitted by a party to the court, in which the party asks the court for a case-ending decision. The typical dispositive motion is called Motion for Summary Judgment.

Another deadline the parties face after the discovery period is the deadline to file pre-trial motions. Pre-trial motions usually deal with evidentiary issues. That is, the parties argue what evidence can be shown to a jury or what must be excluded.

The final step is the trial. In cases outside the Court Annexed Arbitration Program or Short Trial Program, trial can last days and, sometimes, weeks. By the time a trial starts in a case outside the Court Annexed Arbitration Program or Short Trial Program, over a year could have lapsed since the lawsuit was started.

If you or a loved one are facing a lawsuit for injuries you sustained as a result of a car accident in Las Vegas, the experienced personal injury attorneys at D.R. Patti & Associates can assist you. With a combined total of 50+ years of experience, we can advise and guide you through the process and obtain the best results possible.

People Article On Second Lawsuit Against Wayne Newton For Monkey Bite

Recently, D.R. Patti & Associates filed a second lawsuit against Wayne Newton for another alleged attached by Newton’s pet monkey. The victim alleged that she was asked to pose for a photo with the monkey, whose name is Boo. She also alleged she was assured that doing so would be safe. But then, as her lawsuit claims, the monkey attacked and bit her.

In the first lawsuit filed last year, Marc C. Naron, Esq., of D.R. Patti & Associates represented a 15-year old teenager who alleged she was bitten by Newton’s monkey while touring his famed estate, Casa de Shanandoah. 

The Associated Press and People Magazine covered the first lawsuit. Below is the text of People Magazine’s article, which can also be found here.

Wayne Newton’s Pet Monkey Allegedly Attacked a 15-Year-Old Girl

The longtime entertainer is being sued by a Las Vegas woman for at least $15,000

By Joelle Goldstein August 09, 2019 10:47 PM

Wayne Newton‘s pet likely won’t be monkeying around any longer.

On Wednesday, the longtime entertainer, 77, was sued by a Las Vegas woman after she claimed that her daughter was attacked by his pet monkey, Boo, during a visit to Newton’s former estate, the Associated Press reports.

The civil negligence complaint, which was filed in Nevada state court and obtained by the outlet, states that Jocelyne Urena is seeking at least $15,000 in damages on behalf of her daughter, Genevieve, after the alleged incident at Casa de Shenandoah in October 2017.

Jocelyne’s attorney, Marc Naron, told the outlet that Genevieve, then 15, was bitten on her right wrist by the monkey “without any provocation” and sought out emergency hospital treatment after the encounter.

Naron also claimed that Boo, a capuchin monkey, was unleashed and uncaged during the attack at Newton’s former estate, which has since become a tourist attraction that features stables for Newton’s horses and several exotic animals.

In the time since the incident, Naron told the AP that Genevieve has undergone follow-up medical treatment, counseling and suffered a scar from the bite.

“Without any provocation, the monkey viciously attacked and bit Ms. Urena, causing injury to her body as well as emotional distress,” the lawsuit alleges, according to Las Vegas Review-Journal.

Naron did not immediately respond to PEOPLE’s request for comment.

In a statement to PEOPLE, however, Wayne and Kathleen Newton denied any knowledge of the situation.

The couple also said that they had severed ties with the company running their former home three months before the alleged attack due to Newton’s health crisis from a spider bite.

“With regard to this lawsuit, we have not seen the complaint, but our company ceased running Casa de Shenandoah July 1, 2017, due to Wayne’s almost dying from a spider bite,” they said.

“So we are not a party and have no idea what happened in Oct 2017,” the couple added.

Newton and his family lived at Casa de Shenandoah in Paradise, Nevada for over 40 years, according to the AP. In 2010, the singer, known as “Mr. Las Vegas,” sold it to investors who later converted it into a tourist attraction and museum.

CSD LLC., the company who took over Newton’s estate, are also reportedly named in the lawsuit, according to the AP.

Since April 23, 2018, Casa de Shenandoah has been closed due to property “maintenance and upgrades.” No reopening date has been announced.

Newton and his family, meanwhile, have lived at another home since 2013, the AP reports.

Pets and other animals can be so cute; but they can also be dangerous, if not outright deadly. If you or a loved one have been injured by a pet or other animal, you may have a personal injury claim. Call and speak to a Las Vegas personal injury and accident attorney at D.R. Patti to find out what your rights are.

 

Article On Second Lawsuit Against Wayne Newton For Monkey Bite

White Throated Capuchin Monkey Isolated On White Background

Recently, D.R. Patti & Associates filed a second lawsuit against Wayne Newton for another alleged attached by Newton’s pet monkey. The victim alleged that she was asked to pose for a photo with the monkey, whose name is Boo. She also alleged she was assured that doing so would be safe. But then, as her lawsuit claims, the monkey attacked and bit her.

In the first lawsuit filed last year, Marc C. Naron, Esq., of D.R. Patti & Associates represented a 15-year old teenager who alleged she was bitten by Newton’s monkey while touring his famed estate, Casa de Shanandoah.

Below is the text of the article from Wonderwall.

MONKEY BUSINESS

WAYNE NEWTON SUED FOR SECOND TIME OVER ALLEGED PET MONKEY ATTACK

By Mark Gray Wonderwall 

Wayne Newton is being sued by a woman who claims his pet monkey attacked her while she toured his former home. It’s the second time in six months the singer has been sued because of his pet monkey.

In the lawsuit obtained by the Las Vegas Review-Journal, Krystal Warner says she visited the Casa de Shenandoah, where Wayne and his wife lived for decades, in April 2018. While touring the home, she was asked if she wanted to get a picture with Boo the monkey. During the picture taking process, she says she was bitten and “viciously attacked.”

In addition to Mr. Las Vegas, as Wayne is commonly known, a handler is also named in the lawsuit.

The court documents claim everyone “had a duty to exercise due care and keep the dangerous monkey restrained and confined. … Defendants knew, or should have known, that the monkey had a propensity for viciousness and/or a propensity to bite and/or attack.”

In August 2019, a different woman filed a lawsuit on behalf of her daughter, alleging she was also attacked by Boo.

Wayne denied those allegations in court. The “Danke Schoen” crooner’s lawyer was suspicious of the new lawsuit, saying, “The length of time that has passed between the alleged incident and the filing of the lawsuit cast doubt as to the merit of the claim.”

Wayne and his wife, Kathleen, lived at the Casa de Shenandoah for multiple decades but moved out following a bankruptcy sale in 2013. Two years later, it was reopened as a museum that featured Wayne’s car collection and an array of exotic animals, including Boo.

The estate, which has been featured in many movies and television shows such as “Vegas Vacation” and “The Bachelorette,” was shut down as a public attraction in 2018.

Earlier this year, Wayne fought with the owners of Casa de Shenandoah to remove items from the estate.

Pets and other animals can be so cute; but they can also be dangerous, if not outright deadly. If you or a loved one have been injured by a pet or other animal, you may have a personal injury claim. Call and speak to a Las Vegas personal injury and accident attorney at D.R. Patti to find out what your rights are.

 

The Associated Press On The Wayne Newton Monkey Bite Case

The Associates Press On The Wayne Newton Monkey Bite Lawsuit

Recently, Marc C. Naron, Esq., of D.R. Patti & Associates filed suit on behalf of 15-year old Genevieve Urena for personal injuries she sustained when she was bitten by Wayne Newton’s pet monkey named Boo. The bite occurred during a tour of Newton’s former home, Casa De Shanandoah. The Associated Press (AP) wrote about the lawsuit. The AP story can be viewed below.

Pets and other animals can be so cute; but they can also be dangerous, if not outright deadly. If you or a loved one have been injured by a pet or other animal, you may have a personal injury claim. Call and speak to a Las Vegas personal injury attorney at D.R. Patti & Associates to find out what your rights are.

The Los Angeles Times On The Lawsuit Against Wayne Newton Brought By D.R. Patti & Associates

Las Vegas injury trial attorneys

The Los Angeles Times On The Lawsuit Against Wayne Newton Brought By D.R. Patti & Associates

Recently, Marc C. Naron, Esq., of D.R. Patti & Associates filed suit on behalf of 15-year old Genevieve Urena for personal injuries she sustained when she was bitten by Wayne Newton’s pet monkey named Boo. The bite occurred during a tour of Newton’s former home, Casa De Shanandoah. The Associated Press wrote about the lawsuit, and this story was picked up by The Los Angeles Times, amongst others. The text of the article from USA Today is re-printed below.

Wayne Newton sued over monkey biting girl visiting his home

By Associates Press

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Entertainer Wayne Newton is being sued by a Las Vegas woman who claims the veteran crooner’s pet monkey bit and injured her daughter during an invited visit to Newton’s showpiece mansion nearly two years ago.

Jocelyne Urena seeks at least $15,000 in damages on behalf of her daughter, Genevieve, in a civil negligence complaint filed Wednesday in Nevada state court in Las Vegas.

Genevieve, then 15, received emergency hospital treatment for a bite to her right wrist from a capuchin monkey named Boo, her mother’s attorney, Marc Naron, said Thursday.

The lawsuit alleges the monkey attacked the girl without provocation during a tour of Newton’s gilded former estate, Casa de Shenandoah.

Naron said the animal was not caged or on a leash and was being shown to tour guests.

The attorney said he did not know if members of Newton’s family were present at the time.

He said Genevieve underwent follow-up medical treatment, counseling, and bears a scar from the bite.

Newton’s wife, Kathleen McCrone Newton, said in an email that a family business entity broke ties with Casa de Shenandoah in July 2017, three months before the lawsuit alleges the girl was injured.

“We are not a party and have no idea what happened in October 2017,” she said.

The lavish 40-acre (16.2-hectare) property southeast of the Las Vegas Strip was home to “Mr. Las Vegas” and his family for more than 40 years. The walled compound featured several homes, gardens, pools, stables for Newton’s prized Arabian horses and a menagerie of exotic animals also including flamingos, penguins and even a sloth.

The Newtons sold it in 2010 to investors under the name CSD LLC who opened a tourist attraction and museum. The company also is named as a defendant in the lawsuit.

An attorney for the investors at that time said Thursday he no longer represents them.

Newton and his family moved in 2013 to another home.

Now 77, Newton has performed for 60 years. His best-known songs include his signature “Danke Schoen,” his 1965 version of “Red Roses for a Blue Lady,” and “Daddy Don’t You Walk So Fast” in 1972.

Pets and other animals can be so cute; but they can also be dangerous, if not outright deadly. If you or a loved one have been injured by a pet or other animal, you may have a personal injury claim. Call and speak to a Las Vegas personal injury attorney at D.R. Patti & Associates to find out what your rights are.

 

USA Today Article On Wayne Newton Monkey Bite Case

In 2019, Marc C. Naron, Esq., of D.R. Patti & Associates filed suit on behalf of 15-year old Genevieve Urena for personal injuries she sustained when she was bitten by Wayne Newton’s pet monkey named Boo. The bite occurred during a tour of Newton’s former home, Casa De Shanandoah. The Associated Press wrote about the lawsuit, and this story was picked up by USA Today, amongst others. The text of the article from USA Today is re-printed below.

Singer Wayne Newton sued by woman alleging his pet monkey bit her daughter

The Associated Press

Entertainer Wayne Newton is being sued by a Las Vegas woman who claims the veteran crooner’s pet monkey bit and injured her daughter during a visit to Newton’s showpiece mansion nearly two years ago.

Jocelyne Urena seeks at least $15,000 in damages on behalf of her daughter, Genevieve, in a civil negligence complaint filed Wednesday in Nevada state court in Las Vegas, according to the Associated Press.

Genevieve’s age and the nature of her injuries are not described in the lawsuit, which alleges the monkey attacked without provocation during a tour of Newton’s former estate, Casa de Shenandoah.

Urena’s attorney, Marc Naron, did not immediately respond Thursday to messages.

Pets and other animals can be so cute; but they can also be dangerous, if not outright deadly. If you or a loved one have been injured by a pet or other animal, you may have a personal injury claim. Call and speak to a Las Vegas personal injury and accident attorney at D.R. Patti & Associates to find out what your rights are.

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TMZ Covers The Wayne Newton Monkey Bite Lawsuit

White Throated Capuchin Monkey Isolated On White Background

TMZ On The Wayne Newton Monkey Bite Lawsuite

Recently, Marc C. Naron, Esq., of D.R. Patti & Associates filed suit on behalf of 15-year old Genevieve Urena for personal injuries she sustained when she was bitten by Wayne Newton’s pet monkey named Boo. The bite occurred during a tour of Newton’s former home, Casa De Shanandoah. TMZ wrote about the story here.

WAYNE NEWTON SUED

Thanks To Your Monkey

I HAD TO GET A SHOT!!!

Wayne Newton‘s monkey ain’t your average Curious George … cause the teenage girl who says the animal bit her says the injury required medical attention.
TMZ’s obtained a pic of the injury allegedly caused by Wayne’s Capuchin monkey, Boo. The girl’s mother is suing Newton claiming Boo bit her daughter’s right wrist 2 years ago while visiting Newton’s former estate, Casa de Shenandoah … a tourist attraction and museum in Las Vegas.
Their attorney, Marc Naron of D.R. Patti & Associates, says the bite broke the girl’s skin … causing it to swell — and she had to go to a hospital where she got a tetanus shot. The pic, btw, was taken the day after the alleged incident.

We’re told the alleged victim, who was 15 at the time, underwent follow-up treatments and was left with a gnarly scar that may be permanent. She claims she underwent counseling because of her fear of animals.
In the lawsuit, the family says Boo was not caged nor on a leash when they visited back in October 2017.
Wayne and his wife, Kathleen McCrone Newton, tell us they haven’t seen the lawsuit. They add … their company stopped operating Casa de Shenandoah in July 2017, “due to Wayne’s almost dying from a spider bite” — so they have “no idea what happened in October 2017.”